Uptick in depression and teen suicide correlates with online use.

When we were young, we couldn’t compare our lives to every person at every waking moment. We didn’t know when we missed a party. We found out where friends went on summer vacation on the first day of school, and we weren’t judged or bullied or commented on 24 hours a day.

These days, everyone’s life looks sexier, cooler, and faster than it really is. The number of followers a kid has can actually determine social status. This photoshopped version of life is making kids sick. When in fact, everyone struggles. Everyone hurts. Everyone feels like a loser from time to time. You won’t see THAT on social media.

The teen suicide rate among girls hit a record high in 2017, doubling from 2007 to 2016. Please share this article with other parents.

 

ttps://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/11/14/563767149/increased-hours-online-correlate-with-an-uptick-in-teen-depression-suicidal-thou

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